Frequently Asked Questions

Some common clinical questions related to CIDP neuropathy and neuropathy general.

 

  • About Support group
    • How To Speak in a Support Group
      If you would like to share your story, your experience or advice in the support group, please contact us.
    • What is a CIDP Neuropathy Support Group

      A CIDP neuropathy support group is dedicated to educating the public about chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) which is a type of neuropathy that is treatable and highly under-diagnosed among the large population of neuropathy patients.

    • What is the Benefit of a CIDP Support Group?
      The primary benefit is education and information, especially for patients that have been told they have neuropathy and are suffering from CIDP. You can get educated about CIDP by joining the online community, attend the community support group meetings, ask an expert and receive up to date information about CIDP. After becoming a member you will receive updates on the CIDP disease and its treatment
    • How Can I Join the CIDP Support Group
      You can become a member of the online support group of our community. You can also attend the support group meetings in your city. For more information, contact us at 855-782-0574.
    • What is a CIDP Support Group
      This is a support group for education of patient that have been diagnosed with neuropathy but may suffer from CIDP sub-type of neuropathy. For more information, contact us at 855-782-0574.
  • Causes of CIDP
    • Is there a cure for CIDP?
      The only known cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • What is the cure for CIDP?
      The only possible cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • How do I know if I have CIDP?
      CIDP is difficult to determine on its own. Like other kinds of neuropathy, its symptoms include loss of sensation, numbness, tingling and pain. Weakness commonly presents itself as foot drop, or other muscle weaknesses or difficulty in walking. CIDP is diagnosed through a NCV test (nerve conduction velocity). Unfortunately, many neurologists are not experts in the NCV test which is why under-diagnosis of CIDP is common.
    • What Causes CIDP?
      The dominant theory holds that the body’s immune system sees the fatty protective covering of the nerves (myelin sheath) as a foreign entity and begins to attack it. The fatty protective layer is critical for proper functioning of the peripheral nervous system and the propagation of nerve impulses. The fatty protective layer (myelin sheath) allows electrical signals to move along the nerve axon. When the fatty protective layer is destroyed or damaged, electrical signals are disrupted or lost, resulting in pain and impaired sensory and or motor functions.
    • What Are The Common Causes of Neuropathy?
      Idiopathic peripheral neuropathy - when there is no specific cause found for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes - the most common cause of chronic peripheral neuropathy. B12 or folate vitamin deficiencies can cause nerve damage and peripheral neuropathy. Guillain-Barré syndrome is the name given to a specific type of peripheral neuropathy triggered by infection. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammation of nerve roots and peripheral nerves due to damage of fatty protective covering (myelin sheath) over the nerves. Drugs - such as some chemotherapy medication and medicines used to treat HIV can cause damage to peripheral nerves. More than 40-50 drugs are known to cause neuropathy. Poisons (toxins) - insecticides and solvents can cause peripheral nerve damage. Cancers - peripheral neuropathy can occur in people with cancer ( lymphoma and multiple myeloma etc) Alcohol excess - high alcohol levels in the body cause nerve damage. Chronic kidney disease - Kidney disease and kidney failure can cause peripheral neuropathy. Chronic liver disease. Injuries - broken bones and tight plaster casts can put pressure directly on the nerves. Infections - damage can be caused to peripheral nerves by some infections including shingles, HIV infection and Lyme disease. Connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain inflammatory conditions - conditions including sarcoidosis and coeliac disease can also cause peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary diseases - Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and Friedreich's ataxia.
    • What is Demyelinating Neuropathy
      Some peripheral neuropathies are due to damage to the axons (the long, threadlike portion of the nerve cell), while others, such as demyelinating neuropathy, are due to damage to the myelin sheath (Demyelination), the fatty protein that coats and insulates the axon. Peripheral neuropathies may also be caused by a combination of both axonal damage and demyelination. Electrodiagnostic studies (NCV Test) can help healthcare providers determine the type of damage involved.
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
    • What is Demyelination?
      Demyelination is a disease of the nervous system. It consists of  any condition that results in the degeneration of the myelin sheath which is a fatty protective substance that envelops the nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system. When the myelin sheath is damaged, nerve transmission signals are impaired thus leading to various neurological problems.
    • How do I know if I have CIDP?
      CIDP is difficult to determine on its own. Like other kinds of neuropathy, its symptoms include loss of sensation, numbness, tingling and pain. Weakness commonly presents itself as foot drop, or other muscle weaknesses or difficulty in walking. CIDP is diagnosed through a NCV test (nerve conduction velocity). Unfortunately, many neurologists are not experts in the NCV test which is why under-diagnosis of CIDP is common.
    • What is a NCV Test?
      A nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test measures the degree of damage in large nerve fibers, revealing whether symptoms are caused by degeneration of the myelin sheath or the axon. The myelin covering is responsible for the very fast speed of nerve conduction. During this test, a probe electrically stimulates a nerve fiber, which responds by generating its own electrical impulse. An electrode placed further along the nerve’s pathway measures the speed of impulse transmission along the axon. Slow transmission rates and impulse blockage tend to indicate damage to the myelin sheath, while a reduction in the strength of impulses at normal speeds is a sign of axonal degeneration. This test is done by a Neurologists in their office or a trained technician. Electromyography (EMG) involves inserting a fine needle into a muscle to record electrical activity when muscles are at rest and when they contract. EMG tests detect abnormal electrical activity in motor neuropathy and can help differentiate between muscle and nerve disorders. There is limited value of performing EMG test on a patient with suspected neuropathy.
    • How Is CIDP Diagnosed?
      A nerve conduction velocity test is pivotal in the diagnosis of CIDP neuropathy. Unless a nerve conduction velocity test is done, there is no other way to confirm a CIDP diagnosis. Not all neurologists who performed a nerve conduction test are experts in performing it. It happens frequently where a patient may see a neurologist who has performed a nerve conduction test and yet may only be labeled as neuropathy but not CIDP.
    • What are the Consequences of Delaying CIDP Treatment
      Often enough, the diagnosis of CIDP is delayed for months and years at a time. Delay in treatment causes progressive damage to the nerves due to underlying inflammation. Delay treatment can affect its positive long-term outcome.
    • What are the Common Misdiagnoses of Patients with CIDP
      There are several different combinations of CIDP manifestation. CIDP can involve all 4 limbs or just one limb. CIDP can be misdiagnosed as lumbar spine disease, radiculopathy, sciatica, rheumatological diseases, age-related problems, arthritis, fibromyalgia, effects of past stroke. Most commonly, however, CIDP is diagnosed as neuropathy only. Unless a neuropathy is further classified and diagnosed as CIDP subtype of neuropathy, the treatment of CIDP will not be considered by the physicians
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and GBS?
      CIDP and GBS are very similar and are considered chronic counterparts of each other. However, CIDP is chronic and takes at least two months or longer to manifest itself. GBS on the other hand can manifest itself within 24 hours. When GBS becomes a chronic condition, it can be labeled as CIDP. GBS is also known as Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy or AIDP.
    • What Are the Different Kinds of CIDP?
      There can be several types of CIDP. Those subtypes are generally classified based on clinical manifestations. Typical CIDP is a symmetrical motor and sensory progressive neuropathy affecting proximal and distal muscles with loss of deep tendon reflexes. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy is a pure motor disorder in which there is asymmetric weakness in the distribution of individual nerves that can be confirmed by diagnostic nerve conduction results. Lewis-Sumner syndrome is a sensory-motor disorder in which there is sensory loss and weakness in the distribution of individual nerves. Diagnostic nerve conduction studies confirm the focal nerve involvement. Pure sensory CIDP presents with sensory loss, pain, and poor balance with abnormal gait or walking. There is no weakness but frequently motor nerve conduction studies are abnormal in addition to sensory conduction studies. Pure motor CIDP presents with weakness and loss of reflexes without sensory loss. There are other less well-established variants most of which would fall into the category of CIDP.
    • What Does CIDP Stand For?
      CIDP stands for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.
    • What Are The Common Causes of Neuropathy?
      Idiopathic peripheral neuropathy - when there is no specific cause found for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes - the most common cause of chronic peripheral neuropathy. B12 or folate vitamin deficiencies can cause nerve damage and peripheral neuropathy. Guillain-Barré syndrome is the name given to a specific type of peripheral neuropathy triggered by infection. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammation of nerve roots and peripheral nerves due to damage of fatty protective covering (myelin sheath) over the nerves. Drugs - such as some chemotherapy medication and medicines used to treat HIV can cause damage to peripheral nerves. More than 40-50 drugs are known to cause neuropathy. Poisons (toxins) - insecticides and solvents can cause peripheral nerve damage. Cancers - peripheral neuropathy can occur in people with cancer ( lymphoma and multiple myeloma etc) Alcohol excess - high alcohol levels in the body cause nerve damage. Chronic kidney disease - Kidney disease and kidney failure can cause peripheral neuropathy. Chronic liver disease. Injuries - broken bones and tight plaster casts can put pressure directly on the nerves. Infections - damage can be caused to peripheral nerves by some infections including shingles, HIV infection and Lyme disease. Connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. Certain inflammatory conditions - conditions including sarcoidosis and coeliac disease can also cause peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary diseases - Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and Friedreich's ataxia.
    • What is Demyelinating Neuropathy
      Some peripheral neuropathies are due to damage to the axons (the long, threadlike portion of the nerve cell), while others, such as demyelinating neuropathy, are due to damage to the myelin sheath (Demyelination), the fatty protein that coats and insulates the axon. Peripheral neuropathies may also be caused by a combination of both axonal damage and demyelination. Electrodiagnostic studies (NCV Test) can help healthcare providers determine the type of damage involved.
  • CIDP
    • What is the treatment for CIDP?
      CIDP is usually treated with prednisone and other kinds of anti-inflammatory steroids. However, the only treatment available that is known to cure CIDP in some patients is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when it is properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • Is there a cure for CIDP?
      The only known cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • What is the cure for CIDP?
      The only possible cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • How do I know if I have CIDP?
      CIDP is difficult to determine on its own. Like other kinds of neuropathy, its symptoms include loss of sensation, numbness, tingling and pain. Weakness commonly presents itself as foot drop, or other muscle weaknesses or difficulty in walking. CIDP is diagnosed through a NCV test (nerve conduction velocity). Unfortunately, many neurologists are not experts in the NCV test which is why under-diagnosis of CIDP is common.
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and Neuropathy?
      Neuropathy is a general term used for a disorder that is characterized by a gradual and progressive deterioration of the nerves. There are many kinds of neuropathy. CIDP or Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a particular type of autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathy in which the deterioration of the nerves comes about through an inflammation of the nerves.
    • Is Peripheral Neuropathy Reversible?
      Some types of peripheral neuropathy are reversible and can sometimes be cured. CIDP is an inflammatory neuropathy that can sometimes be cured by IVIG treatment when properly administered.
    • What is Peripheral Neuropathy?
      Peripheral neuropathy is neuropathy of the peripheral nerves, such as arms, legs and face. It is frequently characterized by a gradual and progressive worsening of symptoms. Depending on its severity and type, patients can have motor symptoms (weakness) or sensory symptoms (pain, numbness, tingling, burning etc) or mixed symptoms of motor and sensory deficit.
    • What is GBS (Guillain-Barré Syndrome) ?
      GBS (Guillain-Barré Syndrome) is a peripheral neurological disorder characterized by an inflammation of the peripheral nerves. People afflicted with GBS will see a quick onset of symptoms including weakness, numbness and even paralysis of one’s peripheries, including one’s hands, feet, arms and legs. In severe cases breathing and speech muscles can also be weak thus leading to a neurological emergency.  GBS differs from CIDP in that GBS’s onset is very quick, usually manifesting itself within 24-hours whereas CIDP can take over two months to manifests itself.
    • How to Prevent Delay in CIDP Diagnosis
      The best way to prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment of CIDP is education and awareness. While not all neuropathies are CIDP, neuropathy patients should be considered as a potential CIDP patients especially if the patient has weakness and disease progression.
    • What is a NCV Test?
      A nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test measures the degree of damage in large nerve fibers, revealing whether symptoms are caused by degeneration of the myelin sheath or the axon. The myelin covering is responsible for the very fast speed of nerve conduction. During this test, a probe electrically stimulates a nerve fiber, which responds by generating its own electrical impulse. An electrode placed further along the nerve’s pathway measures the speed of impulse transmission along the axon. Slow transmission rates and impulse blockage tend to indicate damage to the myelin sheath, while a reduction in the strength of impulses at normal speeds is a sign of axonal degeneration. This test is done by a Neurologists in their office or a trained technician. Electromyography (EMG) involves inserting a fine needle into a muscle to record electrical activity when muscles are at rest and when they contract. EMG tests detect abnormal electrical activity in motor neuropathy and can help differentiate between muscle and nerve disorders. There is limited value of performing EMG test on a patient with suspected neuropathy.
    • How Is CIDP Diagnosed?
      A nerve conduction velocity test is pivotal in the diagnosis of CIDP neuropathy. Unless a nerve conduction velocity test is done, there is no other way to confirm a CIDP diagnosis. Not all neurologists who performed a nerve conduction test are experts in performing it. It happens frequently where a patient may see a neurologist who has performed a nerve conduction test and yet may only be labeled as neuropathy but not CIDP.
    • What are the Consequences of Delaying CIDP Treatment
      Often enough, the diagnosis of CIDP is delayed for months and years at a time. Delay in treatment causes progressive damage to the nerves due to underlying inflammation. Delay treatment can affect its positive long-term outcome.
    • What are the Common Misdiagnoses of Patients with CIDP
      There are several different combinations of CIDP manifestation. CIDP can involve all 4 limbs or just one limb. CIDP can be misdiagnosed as lumbar spine disease, radiculopathy, sciatica, rheumatological diseases, age-related problems, arthritis, fibromyalgia, effects of past stroke. Most commonly, however, CIDP is diagnosed as neuropathy only. Unless a neuropathy is further classified and diagnosed as CIDP subtype of neuropathy, the treatment of CIDP will not be considered by the physicians
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and GBS?
      CIDP and GBS are very similar and are considered chronic counterparts of each other. However, CIDP is chronic and takes at least two months or longer to manifest itself. GBS on the other hand can manifest itself within 24 hours. When GBS becomes a chronic condition, it can be labeled as CIDP. GBS is also known as Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy or AIDP.
    • What Causes CIDP?
      The dominant theory holds that the body’s immune system sees the fatty protective covering of the nerves (myelin sheath) as a foreign entity and begins to attack it. The fatty protective layer is critical for proper functioning of the peripheral nervous system and the propagation of nerve impulses. The fatty protective layer (myelin sheath) allows electrical signals to move along the nerve axon. When the fatty protective layer is destroyed or damaged, electrical signals are disrupted or lost, resulting in pain and impaired sensory and or motor functions.
    • What Are the Different Kinds of CIDP?
      There can be several types of CIDP. Those subtypes are generally classified based on clinical manifestations. Typical CIDP is a symmetrical motor and sensory progressive neuropathy affecting proximal and distal muscles with loss of deep tendon reflexes. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy is a pure motor disorder in which there is asymmetric weakness in the distribution of individual nerves that can be confirmed by diagnostic nerve conduction results. Lewis-Sumner syndrome is a sensory-motor disorder in which there is sensory loss and weakness in the distribution of individual nerves. Diagnostic nerve conduction studies confirm the focal nerve involvement. Pure sensory CIDP presents with sensory loss, pain, and poor balance with abnormal gait or walking. There is no weakness but frequently motor nerve conduction studies are abnormal in addition to sensory conduction studies. Pure motor CIDP presents with weakness and loss of reflexes without sensory loss. There are other less well-established variants most of which would fall into the category of CIDP.
    • What Does CIDP Stand For?
      CIDP stands for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.
    • What is CIDP?
      CIDP (Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy)  is a neurological disorder characterized by an inflammation in the nerves. The inflammation gradually but progressively destroys the protective covering of the nerves (myelin sheath). Symptoms can include gradual and progressive weakness, pain and an impaired sensory function in the legs and arms. CIDP is an inflammatory autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system begins to attack your peripheral nerves. CIDP is related to GBS (Guillain-Barre syndrome).
    • What is Demyelinating Neuropathy
      Some peripheral neuropathies are due to damage to the axons (the long, threadlike portion of the nerve cell), while others, such as demyelinating neuropathy, are due to damage to the myelin sheath (Demyelination), the fatty protein that coats and insulates the axon. Peripheral neuropathies may also be caused by a combination of both axonal damage and demyelination. Electrodiagnostic studies (NCV Test) can help healthcare providers determine the type of damage involved.
  • CIDP Treatment
    • What is the treatment for CIDP?
      CIDP is usually treated with prednisone and other kinds of anti-inflammatory steroids. However, the only treatment available that is known to cure CIDP in some patients is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when it is properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • Is there a cure for CIDP?
      The only known cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • What is the cure for CIDP?
      The only possible cure for CIDP is IVIG infusion or Intravenous Immunoglobulin when properly administered. Unfortunately, many neurologists do not know how to properly administer IVIG which inevitably affects the success rate of the treatment.
    • Is Peripheral Neuropathy Reversible?
      Some types of peripheral neuropathy are reversible and can sometimes be cured. CIDP is an inflammatory neuropathy that can sometimes be cured by IVIG treatment when properly administered.
    • How to Prevent Delay in CIDP Diagnosis
      The best way to prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment of CIDP is education and awareness. While not all neuropathies are CIDP, neuropathy patients should be considered as a potential CIDP patients especially if the patient has weakness and disease progression.
    • What is a NCV Test?
      A nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test measures the degree of damage in large nerve fibers, revealing whether symptoms are caused by degeneration of the myelin sheath or the axon. The myelin covering is responsible for the very fast speed of nerve conduction. During this test, a probe electrically stimulates a nerve fiber, which responds by generating its own electrical impulse. An electrode placed further along the nerve’s pathway measures the speed of impulse transmission along the axon. Slow transmission rates and impulse blockage tend to indicate damage to the myelin sheath, while a reduction in the strength of impulses at normal speeds is a sign of axonal degeneration. This test is done by a Neurologists in their office or a trained technician. Electromyography (EMG) involves inserting a fine needle into a muscle to record electrical activity when muscles are at rest and when they contract. EMG tests detect abnormal electrical activity in motor neuropathy and can help differentiate between muscle and nerve disorders. There is limited value of performing EMG test on a patient with suspected neuropathy.
    • How Is CIDP Diagnosed?
      A nerve conduction velocity test is pivotal in the diagnosis of CIDP neuropathy. Unless a nerve conduction velocity test is done, there is no other way to confirm a CIDP diagnosis. Not all neurologists who performed a nerve conduction test are experts in performing it. It happens frequently where a patient may see a neurologist who has performed a nerve conduction test and yet may only be labeled as neuropathy but not CIDP.
    • What are the Causes of Delayed CIDP Treatment?
      The most common cause of CIDP treatment delay is a physician's and neurologist's inability to diagnosed a neuropathy patient as CIDP. Patients are frequently diagnosed with neuropathy only and symptomatic treatment is provided. Unless a proper diagnosis of CIDP is established, treatment for CIDP is will not be considered.
    • What are the Consequences of Delaying CIDP Treatment
      Often enough, the diagnosis of CIDP is delayed for months and years at a time. Delay in treatment causes progressive damage to the nerves due to underlying inflammation. Delay treatment can affect its positive long-term outcome.
    • Treatment Options for CIDP Neuropathy
      Intravenous immunoglobulin also known as IVIG therapy is the best treatment option for CIDP. Other treatment options are also used less commonly including the use of steroids for several months, other immunotherapy and in rare cases plasma exchange. IVIG has been known to treat and sometimes cure cidp neuropathy.
  • CIDP vs Neuropathy
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and Neuropathy?
      Neuropathy is a general term used for a disorder that is characterized by a gradual and progressive deterioration of the nerves. There are many kinds of neuropathy. CIDP or Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a particular type of autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathy in which the deterioration of the nerves comes about through an inflammation of the nerves.
    • What is Neuropathy?
      Neuropathy is a disorder and dysfunction of peripheral nerves. Symptoms of neuropathy vary from patient to patient based on severity, chronicity and type of neuropathy. Common symptoms manifest from a nerve dysfunction and show themselves as weakness or sensory symptoms (pain, numbness, tingling, burning etc) in the affected areas. Neuropathy can be diffuse or focal. The areas affected are peripheral nerves (such as arms, legs, face etc.) as opposed to one’s central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). It is usually characterized by a gradual and progressive deterioration of one’s autonomic, motor and sensory nerves. Neuropathy can come about without a known cause, but it can also be the result of a physical trauma, exposure to toxins or it can stem from problems in one’s metabolism. It is common for doctors to be unable to find an underlying cause for neuropathy (this is labeled as Idiopathic Neuropathy). Some types of neuropathy such as CIDP can be treated and sometimes cured with infusion of IVIG therapy.
    • What are the Common Misdiagnoses of Patients with CIDP
      There are several different combinations of CIDP manifestation. CIDP can involve all 4 limbs or just one limb. CIDP can be misdiagnosed as lumbar spine disease, radiculopathy, sciatica, rheumatological diseases, age-related problems, arthritis, fibromyalgia, effects of past stroke. Most commonly, however, CIDP is diagnosed as neuropathy only. Unless a neuropathy is further classified and diagnosed as CIDP subtype of neuropathy, the treatment of CIDP will not be considered by the physicians
    • What is CIDP?
      CIDP (Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy)  is a neurological disorder characterized by an inflammation in the nerves. The inflammation gradually but progressively destroys the protective covering of the nerves (myelin sheath). Symptoms can include gradual and progressive weakness, pain and an impaired sensory function in the legs and arms. CIDP is an inflammatory autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system begins to attack your peripheral nerves. CIDP is related to GBS (Guillain-Barre syndrome).
  • GBS
    • What is GBS (Guillain-Barré Syndrome) ?
      GBS (Guillain-Barré Syndrome) is a peripheral neurological disorder characterized by an inflammation of the peripheral nerves. People afflicted with GBS will see a quick onset of symptoms including weakness, numbness and even paralysis of one’s peripheries, including one’s hands, feet, arms and legs. In severe cases breathing and speech muscles can also be weak thus leading to a neurological emergency.  GBS differs from CIDP in that GBS’s onset is very quick, usually manifesting itself within 24-hours whereas CIDP can take over two months to manifests itself.
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and GBS?
      CIDP and GBS are very similar and are considered chronic counterparts of each other. However, CIDP is chronic and takes at least two months or longer to manifest itself. GBS on the other hand can manifest itself within 24 hours. When GBS becomes a chronic condition, it can be labeled as CIDP. GBS is also known as Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy or AIDP.
  • General Biology FAQ
    • What is ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis)?
      Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that involves the nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. The disease leads to the demise of the motor cells in the brain and spinal cord thus causing severe impairment of movement and possible death.
    • What is Multiple Sclerosis?
      Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and usually progressive disease that is characterized by by an inflammation of the sheaths of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. MS symptoms usually involve numbness, deterioration of speech, deterioration of muscular coordination, deterioration of vision (blurred) and also extreme fatigue.
    • What is an Autoimmune Disease?
      An autoimmune disease develops when your immune system, which is supposed to defend you from various diseases begins to attack healthy tissue in your body thinking that it is a pathogen (foreign). As a consequence of thisyour immune system attacks the healthy tissue and cells in your body. Depending on what kind of autoimmune disease you have, it may attack one or more parts of your body. There are around 80 types of autoimmune diseases, some of the most famous of them include ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis, arthritis and Crohn's disease. CIDP - a form of neuropathy - is also an autoimmune disease.
  • How to Find CIDP Expert
    • How to Find the Right CIDP Doctors
      The first step is to ask your neurologist if they are experienced in diagnosing CIDP (Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy). The second step is to ask if your neurologist is an expert in performing the nerve conduction test.
  • IVIG
    • What is IVIg Treatment?
      IVIg, or intravenous immunoglobulin, is the use of a blend of antibodies (immunoglobulins) to treat patients with weakened immune systems or other diseases in order to fight infections. IVIg is used to treat disorders like CIDP (Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy,) GBS (Guillain-Barre syndrome) and Multiple Sclerosis and even Lupus.
  • Neuropathy
    • What is Demyelination?
      Demyelination is a disease of the nervous system. It consists of  any condition that results in the degeneration of the myelin sheath which is a fatty protective substance that envelops the nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system. When the myelin sheath is damaged, nerve transmission signals are impaired thus leading to various neurological problems.
    • What is the Difference Between CIDP and Neuropathy?
      Neuropathy is a general term used for a disorder that is characterized by a gradual and progressive deterioration of the nerves. There are many kinds of neuropathy. CIDP or Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a particular type of autoimmune and inflammatory neuropathy in which the deterioration of the nerves comes about through an inflammation of the nerves.
    • Is Peripheral Neuropathy Reversible?
      Some types of peripheral neuropathy are reversible and can sometimes be cured. CIDP is an inflammatory neuropathy that can sometimes be cured by IVIG treatment when properly administered.
    • What is Diabetic Neuropathy?
      Diabetic neuropathy is a kind of nerve damage that happens as a result of a complication of a diabetic condition. High blood sugar can lead to damage to the peripheral nerves in the upper and lower extremities. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can include pain and numbness  in one’s hands and feet as well as problems in one’s digestive system. Diabetic neuropathy is often painful. There are several variation of diabetic neuropathy.
    • What is Peripheral Neuropathy?
      Peripheral neuropathy is neuropathy of the peripheral nerves, such as arms, legs and face. It is frequently characterized by a gradual and progressive worsening of symptoms. Depending on its severity and type, patients can have motor symptoms (weakness) or sensory symptoms (pain, numbness, tingling, burning etc) or mixed symptoms of motor and sensory deficit.
    • What is the Cure for Neuropathy?
      Since there is a wide array of neuropathy types, there is no single treatment for the disorder. Drug treatment for neuropathy is mostly symptomatic to relieve symptoms of pain and discomfort. For certain autoimmune mediated forms of neuropathy like CIDP, the treatment of choice is IVIG infusion which can sometimes cure the disease. Certain focal neuropathies such as Carpal tunnel syndrome can be treated with splints or minor surgery.